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National Geographic Orion National Geographic Orion

13-night Best of Chilean Patagonia – from Torres del Paine to Cape Horn Cruise

Roundtrip Santiago

11/15/2020

Ports: Air Travel, Santiago, Santiago, Air Travel, Punta Arenas, Puerto Natales, Puerto Natales, Milodon Cave, Torres del Paine, Torres del Paine, Torres del Paine, Torres del Paine, Cruise Starts (Embarkation), Puerto Natales, Kirke Narrows, Chilean Fjords, Karukinka, Jackson Bay, Chilean Fjords, Beagle Channel, Cape Horn, Isla de Los Estados (Staten Island), Isla de Los Estados (Staten Island), Ushuaia, Cruise Ends (Debarkation), Air Travel, and Santiago

Lindblad Expeditions

National Geographic Orion
#1355563

13-night Best of Chilean Patagonia – from Torres del Paine to Cape Horn Cruise The Signature Collection – Exclusive Amenities
  • $50 per Couple Shipboard Credit

Package Inclusions:

  • 8-nights accommodations
  • All meals aboard ship and more
  • 5-nights hotel accommodations

Available Addons:

Optional roundtrip airfare.
Optional pre or post cruise nights.

Request Quote

Price is per person, double occupancy.

Costs Include: All accommodations aboard ships or in hotels per itinerary or similar, all meals , nonalcoholic beverages* aboard ship and meals on land as indicated, air transportation where indicated as included, shore excursions, sightseeing and entrance fees, special access permits, transfers to and from group flights, use of taxes and service charges, and services of our expedition staff.
*Alcoholic beverages except super-premium brands and crew tips now included on Explorer and Orion.

All fares are quoted in US Dollars.

Information and pricing is subject to change without notice. While we do our very best to ensure that information and pricing appearing in this website is complete and accurate, we cannot be responsible for incomplete and inaccurate representations, which may or may not be under our control. In the event of a pricing error, misrepresentation or omission, we reserve the right to adjust the pricing or make any other corrections. Prices shown are in USD unless stated otherwise.
  • Departure Date
  • Days
  • From/To
  • Ship
  • Offer ID
  • 11/15/2020
  • 13
  • Roundtrip Santiago

  • National Geographic Orion
  • 1355563
    • Destination
    • Arrival Day
    • Departure Day
    • Air Travel
    • 11/16/2020
    • 11/16/2020
    • Depart on an overnight flight to Santiago, Chile. We check in to the Mandarin Oriental (or similar) centrally located in Santiago, and have the morning to relax. Santiago is nearly surrounded by the Andes, which form an inspiring backdrop to our afternoon guided overview of this vibrant city. We explore the Plaza de Armas, the main square, and nearby Presidential Palace, enjoying wonderful views from the many hills that dot the city. In the early evening, we gather for an informal reception and a drink at the hotel. (Day 2: L)

    • Santiago
    • 11/16/2020
    • 11/16/2020
    • Depart on an overnight flight to Santiago, Chile. We check in to the Mandarin Oriental (or similar) centrally located in Santiago, and have the morning to relax. Santiago is nearly surrounded by the Andes, which form an inspiring backdrop to our afternoon guided overview of this vibrant city. We explore the Plaza de Armas, the main square, and nearby Presidential Palace, enjoying wonderful views from the many hills that dot the city. In the early evening, we gather for an informal reception and a drink at the hotel. (Day 2: L)

    • Santiago
    • 11/17/2020
    • 11/17/2020
    • Today we fly from Santiago to Punta Arenas, Chile’s southern gateway to Patagonia, drive to the outpost of Puerto Natales, and check into our fine hotel, The Singular, located on Última Esperanza (Last Hope) Sound. The sound got its name when 16th-century explorers tried and failed to find a route to the Pacific here. This afternoon, we will enjoy a short exploration of the town, including a visit to the small but excellent Municipal Historical Museum, with exhibits on the region’s Native Americans and on its settler past. We have dinner at our hotel. (B,L,D)

    • Air Travel
    • 11/17/2020
    • 11/17/2020
    • Today we fly from Santiago to Punta Arenas, Chile’s southern gateway to Patagonia, drive to the outpost of Puerto Natales, and check into our fine hotel, The Singular, located on Última Esperanza (Last Hope) Sound. The sound got its name when 16th-century explorers tried and failed to find a route to the Pacific here. This afternoon, we will enjoy a short exploration of the town, including a visit to the small but excellent Municipal Historical Museum, with exhibits on the region’s Native Americans and on its settler past. We have dinner at our hotel. (B,L,D)

    • Punta Arenas
    • 11/17/2020
    • 11/17/2020
    • Today we fly from Santiago to Punta Arenas, Chile’s southern gateway to Patagonia, drive to the outpost of Puerto Natales, and check into our fine hotel, The Singular, located on Última Esperanza (Last Hope) Sound. The sound got its name when 16th-century explorers tried and failed to find a route to the Pacific here. This afternoon, we will enjoy a short exploration of the town, including a visit to the small but excellent Municipal Historical Museum, with exhibits on the region’s Native Americans and on its settler past. We have dinner at our hotel. (B,L,D)

    • Puerto Natales
    • 11/17/2020
    • 11/17/2020
    • Today we fly from Santiago to Punta Arenas, Chile’s southern gateway to Patagonia, drive to the outpost of Puerto Natales, and check into our fine hotel, The Singular, located on Última Esperanza (Last Hope) Sound. The sound got its name when 16th-century explorers tried and failed to find a route to the Pacific here. This afternoon, we will enjoy a short exploration of the town, including a visit to the small but excellent Municipal Historical Museum, with exhibits on the region’s Native Americans and on its settler past. We have dinner at our hotel. (B,L,D)

    • Puerto Natales
    • 11/18/2020
    • 11/18/2020
    • Milodon Cave
    • 11/18/2020
    • 11/18/2020
    • Torres del Paine
    • 11/18/2020
    • 11/18/2020
    • Torres del Paine
    • 11/19/2020
    • 11/19/2020
    • Torres del Paine
    • 11/20/2020
    • 11/20/2020
    • We drive to Torres del Paine National Park, stopping at Milodón Cave, where the remains of an extinct giant sloth were discovered. Illuminating displays show the history of human habitation and wildlife of the region. We continue to monumental Torres del Paine, a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and a place of superlatives. The landscape is big, wide, and sprawling, with razor-backed ridges, Andean condors, guanacos, foxes, and rheas. Regardless of where you are, the Paine massif draws your eye with its jagged peaks, including the famous “Horns” and the three towers for which the park is named. These granite mountains are topped with a thick layer of dark slate. Chileans themselves dream of visiting this magnificent park, and it holds a special place in their hearts as a symbol of wildness. We spend three nights at the Tierra Patagonia Hotel & Spa, a member of the National Geographic Unique Lodges of the World collection. During our days here, we’ll discover one of the most spectacular and wildlife-rich areas in the Americas, covering 450,000 acres of glaciers, forests, and grasslands, rivers and colorful lakes and lagoons. You’ll be able to choose among a variety of excursions each day, ranging from a challenging hike to the base of the towers, to a shorter walk among guanaco herds to the edge of a lake, to a scenic drive to a waterfall and the “Blue Lagoon”, with views of the towers. Or ride horseback if you wish, in this most inspiring of landscapes. You’ll leave here with the feeling you’ve really experienced an adventure. (B,L,D)

    • Torres del Paine
    • 11/21/2020
    • 11/21/2020
    • We have a final morning to explore Torres del Paine. We then drive to Puerto Natales, where we embark National Geographic Orion. (B,L,D)

    • Cruise Starts (Embarkation)
    • 11/21/2020
    • 11/21/2020
    • We have a final morning to explore Torres del Paine. We then drive to Puerto Natales, where we embark National Geographic Orion. (B,L,D)

    • Puerto Natales
    • 11/21/2020
    • 11/21/2020
    • We have a final morning to explore Torres del Paine. We then drive to Puerto Natales, where we embark National Geographic Orion. (B,L,D)

    • Kirke Narrows
    • 11/22/2020
    • 11/22/2020
    • Be on deck to look for condors and other wildlife on our way out of Puerto Natales, as our ship transits the narrow sliver of water known as the Kirke Narrows—always a challenge to navigate because of the powerful currents that flow through its pinch point. Today and during the following days you will be treated to the spectacular features of an active glaciated landscape with hanging valleys and tributary glaciers. This region was navigated by Ferdinand Magellan’s expedition and it took most of November 1520 for his ships to find a way through the channels that lie between the continental mainland and Tierra del Fuego to the south. Our captain and local pilots guide us through Kirke Narrows, accessible only to a small ship as National Geographic Orion. We’ll look to make a first stop in the extensive maze of channels and islands of the Chilean fjords, where we may go out by Zodiac and kayak. (B,L,D)

    • Chilean Fjords
    • 11/23/2020
    • 11/23/2020
    • Karukinka Natural Park: Tierra del Fuego is one of Patagonia’s crown jewels. We visit its newest and largest protected area: Karukinka Natural Park. Established in 2004 through a gift from Goldman Sachs, Karukinka is one of the largest donations ever made for conservation. We’re thrilled to have special permission from the Wildlife Conservation Society to visit this private reserve, which spans 1,160 square miles and harbors endangered culpeo fox, Andean condors, albatross, grebes, petrels, fulmars, shearwaters, and many other kinds of wildlife. We may explore Jackson Bay, backed by a skyline of rugged mountains and look or wildlife including black-browed albatross that nest on one of the nearby small islands. We may walk a trail to a lovely waterfall and look for elephant seals resting on not only the beach but also high in the grass meadows and even in the small river draining the valley inland. (B,L,D)

    • Karukinka
    • 11/24/2020
    • 11/24/2020
    • We’ll explore more stunning wilderness as we see the fjords and glaciers of the region by Zodiac, kayak, and on foot. Take Zodiacs out to explore these protected waters and rugged shores, the blue and white of ice contrasting with greens of the forest highlighted by splashes of late-season flowering plants. Look for the Andean condors, albatrosses, grebes, petrels, fulmars, shearwaters, and many other birds that inhabit this otherworldly realm. Then we sail the Beagle Channel and will look to hike and kayak one of the wild areas in this region of beech forests, mountains, and wild rivers. (B,L,D)

    • Jackson Bay
    • 11/24/2020
    • 11/24/2020
    • We’ll explore more stunning wilderness as we see the fjords and glaciers of the region by Zodiac, kayak, and on foot. Take Zodiacs out to explore these protected waters and rugged shores, the blue and white of ice contrasting with greens of the forest highlighted by splashes of late-season flowering plants. Look for the Andean condors, albatrosses, grebes, petrels, fulmars, shearwaters, and many other birds that inhabit this otherworldly realm. Then we sail the Beagle Channel and will look to hike and kayak one of the wild areas in this region of beech forests, mountains, and wild rivers. (B,L,D)

    • Chilean Fjords
    • 11/25/2020
    • 11/25/2020
    • Today we visit Cape Horn, near the southernmost tip of the South American continent, named in 1616 for the Dutch town of Hoorn. These waters are famously difficult to navigate, and over the centuries have been the graveyard of many ships—which before the opening of the Panama Canal had to round the cape to sail between the Pacific and Atlantic. During the Age of Sail, sailing ships often had to struggle with the winds and currents for days or even weeks. Of course, we’ll use our modern equipment and decades of experience to explore safely. Weather permitting, we’ll take our Zodiacs ashore and walk to the top of a hill for panoramic views and to see the memorial placed there in 1992, showing an albatross in silhouette. There’s also a lighthouse and small museum, and moving plaques commemorate those who explored Cape Horn and those sailors who lost their lives in these waters. (B,L,D)

    • Beagle Channel
    • 11/25/2020
    • 11/25/2020
    • We’ll explore more stunning wilderness as we see the fjords and glaciers of the region by Zodiac, kayak, and on foot. Take Zodiacs out to explore these protected waters and rugged shores, the blue and white of ice contrasting with greens of the forest highlighted by splashes of late-season flowering plants. Look for the Andean condors, albatrosses, grebes, petrels, fulmars, shearwaters, and many other birds that inhabit this otherworldly realm. Then we sail the Beagle Channel and will look to hike and kayak one of the wild areas in this region of beech forests, mountains, and wild rivers. (B,L,D),

    • Cape Horn
    • 11/26/2020
    • 11/26/2020
    • We have been given special permission to visit extraordinary Staten Island. National Geographic Explorer is one of the only expedition ships ever allowed here, and you will be among the few people ever to set foot here. It’s a place of superlatives, barely touched in recent decades and visited primarily by a few scientists and those who man the tiny naval observatory. The island was named by Dutch explorers in 1615. Its mountainous forested landscapes and rugged fjords are beautiful, and we’ll find a great deal of interest here. Our exact schedule will remain flexible to take the best advantage of conditions. We’ll look for southern rockhopper and Magellanic penguins, many other water birds, and fur seals and sea lions. With luck we may find marine otters on our landings ashore; and we’ll see the replica of the 1884 San Juan de Salvamento “lighthouse at the end of the world”, which inspired Jules Verne’s novel by the same name. Although Verne never came anywhere near Staten Island, the vivid depictions in his adventure story have inspired generations of readers. There will be chances to walk in the southern beech forests and through tussock grasslands. And weather permitting, take a Zodiac cruise at remarkable Observatory Island, one of the largest and most diverse bird nesting areas in the entire region, with large numbers of southern sea lions and South American fur seals. These days are bound to stand out as a unique chance to explore a very remote place. Read Eric Guth’s account from our inaugural 2015 visit at www.expeditions.com/si_first. (B,L,D)

    • Isla de Los Estados (Staten Island)
    • 11/27/2020
    • 11/27/2020
    • We have been given special permission to visit extraordinary Staten Island. National Geographic Explorer is one of the only expedition ships ever allowed here, and you will be among the few people ever to set foot here. It’s a place of superlatives, barely touched in recent decades and visited primarily by a few scientists and those who man the tiny naval observatory. The island was named by Dutch explorers in 1615. Its mountainous forested landscapes and rugged fjords are beautiful, and we’ll find a great deal of interest here. Our exact schedule will remain flexible to take the best advantage of conditions. We’ll look for southern rockhopper and Magellanic penguins, many other water birds, and fur seals and sea lions. With luck we may find marine otters on our landings ashore; and we’ll see the replica of the 1884 San Juan de Salvamento “lighthouse at the end of the world”, which inspired Jules Verne’s novel by the same name. Although Verne never came anywhere near Staten Island, the vivid depictions in his adventure story have inspired generations of readers. There will be chances to walk in the southern beech forests and through tussock grasslands. And weather permitting, take a Zodiac cruise at remarkable Observatory Island, one of the largest and most diverse bird nesting areas in the entire region, with large numbers of southern sea lions and South American fur seals. These days are bound to stand out as a unique chance to explore a very remote place. Read Eric Guth’s account from our inaugural 2015 visit at www.expeditions.com/si_first. (B,L,D),

    • Isla de Los Estados (Staten Island)
    • 11/28/2020
    • 11/28/2020
    • Ushuaia
    • 11/29/2020
    • 11/29/2020
    • Cruise Ends (Debarkation)
    • 11/29/2020
    • 11/29/2020
    • Air Travel
    • 11/29/2020
    • 11/29/2020
    • Santiago
    • 11/29/2020
    • 11/29/2020

National Geographic Orion

National Geographic Orion

National Geographic Orion Specifications

  • Tonnage: 4,000
  • Year Built: 2003
  • Total Rooms: 53
  • Passenger Decks: 3
  • Number of Crew: 75
  • Total Capacity: 106
  • Passenger Capacity: 102

Lindblad Expeditions

Lindblad Expeditions

Description:

Since 1979, Lindblad Expeditions has provided an alternative way to explore the world. Although each expedition is different, there are some elements that are common to all of them: they are designed to take you to places of natural beauty and compelling history, avoiding crowded tourist stops to actively experience beauty, wilderness and the seldom-seen. While the destinations may be adventurous, guests enjoy comfortable accommodations, fine food and service. An enthusiastic staff of naturalists and historians, National Geographic photographers, and Lindblad-National Geographic certified photographers are on hand to share their knowledge and inspire you. Drawn from the top tiers of journalism, science, and world affairs, the speakers in our Global Perspectives program add an extra layer of insight  to the expertise our expedition team and National Geographic photographers provide. Available exclusively aboard National Geographic Explorer, our program enables guests’ to travel with fascinating people that they might have seen in the news, on television, or in a lecture hall – now easily available to them in person, in the intimate and conversational context of an expedition. You’ll experience the sheer joy of traveling to new, exciting places with a small group of like-minded people, in an informal atmosphere. Spontaneity and flexibility are hallmarks of Lindblad’s expedition style, so you’ll always experience the wonders of the unplanned events nature provides along the way, from breaching whales, to an inspection of the ship by a curious young polar bear.

Inspired by Jacques Cousteau, Sylvia Earle, Bob Ballard  and other National Geographic explorers, Lindblad ships travel with undersea specialists who dive to video and reveal the undersea – then displayed in the warmth of the ship’s lounge in vivid HD with interesting commentary by the specialist. The footage may be of marine life few scientists, or human eyes for that matter, have ever seen.

Lindblad Expeditions + National Geographic Alliance

Since 2004 the multifaceted Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic alliance has inspired travelers to participate in the world of natural and cultural history as engaged, active explorers who care about the planet and it has enabled them to interact with world-renowned scientists, naturalists and researchers and uncover stunning natural environments alongside skilled specialists utilizing state-of-the-art exploration tools.

Ships Description:

Lindblad’s fleet consists of nimble, intimately-scaled expedition ships, able to safely venture where larger cruise ships cannot!

Special Programs:

Explore your world for yourself! Participate in citizen science and have meaningful, personal encounters with nature.

Fees Statement:
Prices are per person and include cabin fare, taxes, fees, excursions and all meals while onboard.  Airfare is available at an additional charge unless otherwise stated.

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