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Lindblad Expeditions
Lindblad Expeditions
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National Geographic Islander National Geographic Islander

8-night Wild Galápagos & Peru Escape Cruise

Lima/Guayaquil

11/28/2020

Ports: Lima, Cuzco, Urubamba, Urubamba, Ollantaytambo, Aguas Calientes (Peru), Machu Picchu, Urubamba, Cuzco, Air Travel, Lima, Guayaquil, Guayaquil, Air Travel, Isla Baltra, Isla Baltra Ferry Dock, Isla Santa Cruz Ferry Dock, Santa Cruz Highlands, Cruise Starts (Embarkation), Puerto Ayora, Sullivan Bay, Chinese Hat Island, Isla Santa Fe, Genovesa (Tower) Island, South Plaza, Isla Baltra, Cruise Ends (Debarkation), Air Travel, and Guayaquil

Lindblad Expeditions

National Geographic Islander
#1321444

8-night Wild Galápagos & Peru Escape Cruise The Signature Collection – Exclusive Amenities
  • $50 per Couple Shipboard Credit
  • Starting at
    $6,660.00
  • Per day
    $832.50

Package Inclusions:

  • 8-nights accommodations
  • All meals aboard ship
  • And more

Available Addons:

Optional roundtrip airfare.
Optional pre or post cruise nights.

Request Quote

Price is per person, double occupancy.

Cost Includes: All accommodations aboard ships or in hotels per itinerary or similar, all meals and nonalcoholic beverages aboard ship, meals on land as indicated, air transportation where indicated as included, shore excursions, sightseeing and entrance fees, special access permits, transfers to and from group flights, use of snorkeling equipment and wet suits, use of kayaks (where available), tips (except to ship’s crew), taxes and service charges, services of a ship physician on most voyages, and services of our expedition staff.

Not Included: Air transportation (except where shown as included), extensions, passport, visa, immigration fees, scuba diving (where available), meals not indicated, baggage/accident/travel protection plan, items of a personal nature, such as alcoholic beverages, e-mail, laundry. Gratuities to ship’s crew at your discretion.

All fares are quoted in US Dollars.

Information and pricing is subject to change without notice. While we do our very best to ensure that information and pricing appearing in this website is complete and accurate, we cannot be responsible for incomplete and inaccurate representations, which may or may not be under our control. In the event of a pricing error, misrepresentation or omission, we reserve the right to adjust the pricing or make any other corrections. Prices shown are in USD unless stated otherwise.
  • Departure Date
  • Days
  • From/To
  • Ship
  • Offer ID
  • 11/28/2020
  • 8
  • Lima/Guayaquil

  • National Geographic Islander
  • 1321444
    • Destination
    • Arrival Day
    • Departure Day
    • Lima
    • 11/28/2020
    • 11/28/2020
    • This morning fly to Cusco, where we have lunch overlooking the Plaza de Armas in the colonial center of this Inca imperial city. Continue through the fabled and fertile Urubamba Valley to Tambo del Inka, our base for two nights. National Geographic Grantee Nilda Callañaupa, the founder of the Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco, joins us to demonstrate Inca weaving traditions. Dinner tonight is at the hotel. (B,L,D)

    • Cuzco
    • 11/28/2020
    • 11/28/2020
    • This morning fly to Cusco, where we have lunch overlooking the Plaza de Armas in the colonial center of this Inca imperial city. Continue through the fabled and fertile Urubamba Valley to Tambo del Inka, our base for two nights. National Geographic Grantee Nilda Callañaupa, the founder of the Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco, joins us to demonstrate Inca weaving traditions. Dinner tonight is at the hotel. (B,L,D)

    • Urubamba
    • 11/28/2020
    • 11/28/2020
    • Arrive in Lima, Peru’s thriving capital, and transfer to the convenient Lima Airport Holiday Inn. If you’d like to arrive early, we suggest Belmond Miraflores Park, set along a fashionable seaside promenade. Miami is a convenient gateway but, depending on where you live, you may fly from another departure city. Please ask an expedition specialist about alternatives.

    • Urubamba
    • 11/29/2020
    • 11/29/2020
    • Journey after breakfast to Ollantaytambo, where massive stone walls stand sentry over a thriving Inca community. Here we board our train to Machu Picchu—the Inca royal retreat famously introduced to the world by Hiram Bingham in the April 1913 issue of National Geographic magazine. Set at less than 8,000 feet in the “eyebrow of the jungle”, the sanctuary is set in a tropical mountain forest with diverse birds and orchids. We have the leisure today of lunch aboard Inca Rail and a full afternoon at the celebrated Inca site. We linger after day-visitors are long gone, returning to Machu Picchu pueblo for the train back to the Sacred Valley and Tambo del Inka this evening with dinner served aboard. (B,L,D)

    • Ollantaytambo
    • 11/29/2020
    • 11/29/2020
    • Journey after breakfast to Ollantaytambo, where massive stone walls stand sentry over a thriving Inca community. Here we board our train to Machu Picchu—the Inca royal retreat famously introduced to the world by Hiram Bingham in the April 1913 issue of National Geographic magazine. Set at less than 8,000 feet in the “eyebrow of the jungle”, the sanctuary is set in a tropical mountain forest with diverse birds and orchids. We have the leisure today of lunch aboard Inca Rail and a full afternoon at the celebrated Inca site. We linger after day-visitors are long gone, returning to Machu Picchu pueblo for the train back to the Sacred Valley and Tambo del Inka this evening with dinner served aboard. (B,L,D)

    • Aguas Calientes (Peru)
    • 11/29/2020
    • 11/29/2020
    • This morning fly to Cusco, where we have lunch overlooking the Plaza de Armas in the colonial center of this Inca imperial city. Continue through the fabled and fertile Urubamba Valley to Tambo del Inka, our base for two nights. National Geographic Grantee Nilda Callañaupa, the founder of the Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco, joins us to demonstrate Inca weaving traditions. Dinner tonight is at the hotel. (B,L,D)

    • Machu Picchu
    • 11/29/2020
    • 11/29/2020
    • This morning fly to Cusco, where we have lunch overlooking the Plaza de Armas in the colonial center of this Inca imperial city. Continue through the fabled and fertile Urubamba Valley to Tambo del Inka, our base for two nights. National Geographic Grantee Nilda Callañaupa, the founder of the Centro de Textiles Tradicionales del Cusco, joins us to demonstrate Inca weaving traditions. Dinner tonight is at the hotel. (B,L,D)

    • Urubamba
    • 11/30/2020
    • 11/30/2020
    • We bid farewell to Peru today and continue to Ecuador for Part 2 of our expedition with flights from Cusco via Lima to Guayaquil, Ecuador’s largest city. We transfer to the Hotel del Parque, a tranquil haven set in a historic property surrounded by lush gardens. (B,L,D)

    • Cuzco
    • 11/30/2020
    • 11/30/2020
    • We bid farewell to Peru today and continue to Ecuador for Part 2 of our expedition with flights from Cusco via Lima to Guayaquil, Ecuador’s largest city. We transfer to the Hotel del Parque, a tranquil haven set in a historic property surrounded by lush gardens. (B,L,D)

    • Air Travel
    • 11/30/2020
    • 11/30/2020
    • We bid farewell to Peru today and continue to Ecuador for Part 2 of our expedition with flights from Cusco via Lima to Guayaquil, Ecuador’s largest city. We transfer to the Hotel del Parque, a tranquil haven set in a historic property surrounded by lush gardens. (B,L,D)

    • Lima
    • 11/30/2020
    • 11/30/2020
    • Journey after breakfast to Ollantaytambo, where massive stone walls stand sentry over a thriving Inca community. Here we board our train to Machu Picchu—the Inca royal retreat famously introduced to the world by Hiram Bingham in the April 1913 issue of National Geographic magazine. Set at less than 8,000 feet in the “eyebrow of the jungle”, the sanctuary is set in a tropical mountain forest with diverse birds and orchids. We have the leisure today of lunch aboard Inca Rail and a full afternoon at the celebrated Inca site. We linger after day-visitors are long gone, returning to Machu Picchu pueblo for the train back to the Sacred Valley and Tambo del Inka this evening with dinner served aboard. (B,L,D)

    • Guayaquil
    • 11/30/2020
    • 11/30/2020
    • Journey after breakfast to Ollantaytambo, where massive stone walls stand sentry over a thriving Inca community. Here we board our train to Machu Picchu—the Inca royal retreat famously introduced to the world by Hiram Bingham in the April 1913 issue of National Geographic magazine. Set at less than 8,000 feet in the “eyebrow of the jungle”, the sanctuary is set in a tropical mountain forest with diverse birds and orchids. We have the leisure today of lunch aboard Inca Rail and a full afternoon at the celebrated Inca site. We linger after day-visitors are long gone, returning to Machu Picchu pueblo for the train back to the Sacred Valley and Tambo del Inka this evening with dinner served aboard. (B,L,D)

    • Guayaquil
    • 12/01/2020
    • 12/01/2020
    • Air Travel
    • 12/01/2020
    • 12/01/2020
    • Isla Baltra
    • 12/01/2020
    • 12/01/2020
    • Isla Baltra Ferry Dock
    • 12/01/2020
    • 12/01/2020
    • Isla Santa Cruz Ferry Dock
    • 12/01/2020
    • 12/01/2020
    • Santa Cruz Highlands
    • 12/01/2020
    • 12/01/2020
    • Cruise Starts (Embarkation)
    • 12/01/2020
    • 12/01/2020
    • We bid farewell to Peru today and continue to Ecuador for Part 2 of our expedition with flights from Cusco via Lima to Guayaquil, Ecuador’s largest city. We transfer to the Hotel del Parque, a tranquil haven set in a historic property surrounded by lush gardens. (B,L,D)

    • Puerto Ayora
    • 12/01/2020
    • 12/01/2020
    • We bid farewell to Peru today and continue to Ecuador for Part 2 of our expedition with flights from Cusco via Lima to Guayaquil, Ecuador’s largest city. We transfer to the Hotel del Parque, a tranquil haven set in a historic property surrounded by lush gardens. (B,L,D)

    • Sullivan Bay
    • 12/02/2020
    • 12/02/2020
    • Fly on Day 5 to Galápagos, where we start off exploring Darwin’s iconic islands. Part of the magic of any Galápagos voyage is the varied nature of the terrain, wildlife, and experiences that each island offers. Here are the diverse islands that we expect to visit on this expedition. SANTA CRUZ: The town of Puerto Ayora, lined with shops, hotels, and restaurants, is connected by road across the island and a short canal-crossing to Baltra, the island on the north coast, home to a WWII-era U.S. Army air force base and still the main airport in Galápagos. See wild tortoises roaming free in the green highlands of this central Island. Be greeted as a friend in Puerto Ayora on the south coast, headquarters of the Galápagos National Park and Charles Darwin Research Station. Tour the giant tortoise breeding corrals, a pioneering effort that has resulted in the repopulation of Española and other islands. See Lonesome George, the last tortoise from Isla Pinta, at the center of the Route of the Tortoises. SOUTH PLAZA: Sea lions greet us at South Plaza, an uplifted block carpeted in salt-loving succulents and teeming with wildlife, including a noisy group of bachelor sea lions and a population of land iguanas. Thread your way across the island through an impressive forest of cactus trees, and thrill at aerial displays of the nocturnal cliff-nesting swallow-tailed gulls and red-tailed tropicbirds. This is a beautiful place to sit and take in the view. SANTA FE: Linger and swim from the secluded cove at Barrington Bay, where a trail leads us through the largest cactus trees in Galápagos. The Santa Fe land iguana is found only on this island, where Galápagos hawks are also thriving once again after being reintroduced. SANTIAGO: Snorkel and explore by kayak and Zodiac the crystalline water surrounding Sombrero Chino, one of a group of distinctively shaped small islets off Santiago. Hike over the smooth pahoehoe lava and admire spatter cones, little miniature hornitos, and the wild riot of black lava at Sullivan Bay, the result an eruption recorded by passing buccaneers in 1897. Keep a keen eye for the Galápagos penguin, sometimes spotted along the coast. The southeast coast of Santiago is a one-stop overview of the diverse geology of these young islands. GENOVESA: Sail north across the Equator to the remote northern realm of the Galápagos, bathed in warmer tropical waters and home to the red-footed boobies, Nazca boobies, swallow-tailed gulls, great frigatebirds, and other nesting seabirds. You’ll want to be on deck as we sail into the flooded caldera, often accompanied by an escort of seabirds. Kayak, paddleboard, snorkel, and cruise along the caldera walls, where we may see shy Galápagos fur seals. Photograph red-footed boobies and frigatebirds of two species perching precariously in the low-lying shrubs behind coral-strewn Darwin Bay Beach. At Prince Philip’s Steps, follow a trail inland, where more seabirds nest—and where we might see short-eared owls hunt for wedge-rumped storm petrels, which nest in astounding numbers in the field of broken lava.

    • Chinese Hat Island
    • 12/03/2020
    • 12/03/2020
    • Fly on Day 5 to Galápagos, where we start off exploring Darwin’s iconic islands. Part of the magic of any Galápagos voyage is the varied nature of the terrain, wildlife, and experiences that each island offers. Here are the diverse islands that we expect to visit on this expedition. SANTA CRUZ: The town of Puerto Ayora, lined with shops, hotels, and restaurants, is connected by road across the island and a short canal-crossing to Baltra, the island on the north coast, home to a WWII-era U.S. Army air force base and still the main airport in Galápagos. See wild tortoises roaming free in the green highlands of this central Island. Be greeted as a friend in Puerto Ayora on the south coast, headquarters of the Galápagos National Park and Charles Darwin Research Station. Tour the giant tortoise breeding corrals, a pioneering effort that has resulted in the repopulation of Española and other islands. See Lonesome George, the last tortoise from Isla Pinta, at the center of the Route of the Tortoises. SOUTH PLAZA: Sea lions greet us at South Plaza, an uplifted block carpeted in salt-loving succulents and teeming with wildlife, including a noisy group of bachelor sea lions and a population of land iguanas. Thread your way across the island through an impressive forest of cactus trees, and thrill at aerial displays of the nocturnal cliff-nesting swallow-tailed gulls and red-tailed tropicbirds. This is a beautiful place to sit and take in the view. SANTA FE: Linger and swim from the secluded cove at Barrington Bay, where a trail leads us through the largest cactus trees in Galápagos. The Santa Fe land iguana is found only on this island, where Galápagos hawks are also thriving once again after being reintroduced. SANTIAGO: Snorkel and explore by kayak and Zodiac the crystalline water surrounding Sombrero Chino, one of a group of distinctively shaped small islets off Santiago. Hike over the smooth pahoehoe lava and admire spatter cones, little miniature hornitos, and the wild riot of black lava at Sullivan Bay, the result an eruption recorded by passing buccaneers in 1897. Keep a keen eye for the Galápagos penguin, sometimes spotted along the coast. The southeast coast of Santiago is a one-stop overview of the diverse geology of these young islands. GENOVESA: Sail north across the Equator to the remote northern realm of the Galápagos, bathed in warmer tropical waters and home to the red-footed boobies, Nazca boobies, swallow-tailed gulls, great frigatebirds, and other nesting seabirds. You’ll want to be on deck as we sail into the flooded caldera, often accompanied by an escort of seabirds. Kayak, paddleboard, snorkel, and cruise along the caldera walls, where we may see shy Galápagos fur seals. Photograph red-footed boobies and frigatebirds of two species perching precariously in the low-lying shrubs behind coral-strewn Darwin Bay Beach. At Prince Philip’s Steps, follow a trail inland, where more seabirds nest—and where we might see short-eared owls hunt for wedge-rumped storm petrels, which nest in astounding numbers in the field of broken lava.

    • Isla Santa Fe
    • 12/04/2020
    • 12/04/2020
    • Disembark this morning in Baltra and fly to Guayaquil, where we enjoy dayrooms at the Hotel del Parque. You may elect to spend the night and return home on Day 10 at no additional cost—or continue to Quito. Ask your expedition specialist.

    • Genovesa (Tower) Island
    • 12/04/2020
    • 12/04/2020
    • Fly on Day 5 to Galápagos, where we start off exploring Darwin’s iconic islands. Part of the magic of any Galápagos voyage is the varied nature of the terrain, wildlife, and experiences that each island offers. Here are the diverse islands that we expect to visit on this expedition. SANTA CRUZ: The town of Puerto Ayora, lined with shops, hotels, and restaurants, is connected by road across the island and a short canal-crossing to Baltra, the island on the north coast, home to a WWII-era U.S. Army air force base and still the main airport in Galápagos. See wild tortoises roaming free in the green highlands of this central Island. Be greeted as a friend in Puerto Ayora on the south coast, headquarters of the Galápagos National Park and Charles Darwin Research Station. Tour the giant tortoise breeding corrals, a pioneering effort that has resulted in the repopulation of Española and other islands. See Lonesome George, the last tortoise from Isla Pinta, at the center of the Route of the Tortoises. SOUTH PLAZA: Sea lions greet us at South Plaza, an uplifted block carpeted in salt-loving succulents and teeming with wildlife, including a noisy group of bachelor sea lions and a population of land iguanas. Thread your way across the island through an impressive forest of cactus trees, and thrill at aerial displays of the nocturnal cliff-nesting swallow-tailed gulls and red-tailed tropicbirds. This is a beautiful place to sit and take in the view. SANTA FE: Linger and swim from the secluded cove at Barrington Bay, where a trail leads us through the largest cactus trees in Galápagos. The Santa Fe land iguana is found only on this island, where Galápagos hawks are also thriving once again after being reintroduced. SANTIAGO: Snorkel and explore by kayak and Zodiac the crystalline water surrounding Sombrero Chino, one of a group of distinctively shaped small islets off Santiago. Hike over the smooth pahoehoe lava and admire spatter cones, little miniature hornitos, and the wild riot of black lava at Sullivan Bay, the result an eruption recorded by passing buccaneers in 1897. Keep a keen eye for the Galápagos penguin, sometimes spotted along the coast. The southeast coast of Santiago is a one-stop overview of the diverse geology of these young islands. GENOVESA: Sail north across the Equator to the remote northern realm of the Galápagos, bathed in warmer tropical waters and home to the red-footed boobies, Nazca boobies, swallow-tailed gulls, great frigatebirds, and other nesting seabirds. You’ll want to be on deck as we sail into the flooded caldera, often accompanied by an escort of seabirds. Kayak, paddleboard, snorkel, and cruise along the caldera walls, where we may see shy Galápagos fur seals. Photograph red-footed boobies and frigatebirds of two species perching precariously in the low-lying shrubs behind coral-strewn Darwin Bay Beach. At Prince Philip’s Steps, follow a trail inland, where more seabirds nest—and where we might see short-eared owls hunt for wedge-rumped storm petrels, which nest in astounding numbers in the field of broken lava.

    • South Plaza
    • 12/04/2020
    • 12/04/2020
    • Fly on Day 5 to Galápagos. Each day we join our naturalists on interpretive walks, swim, snorkel, or explore by kayak or Zodiac—all the while witnessing incredible interactions between animals in their natural habitat. Start exploring on Isla Santa Cruz with a trip over the highlands of Santa Cruz. We search for penguins on stark black lava at Sullivan Bay on Santiago, swim in a secluded cove on Santa Fe, snorkel in crystal-clear water at Sombrero Chino, sail across the Equator into the flooded caldera at Genovesa, a seabird paradise, and wander among sea lions and land iguanas on Plaza Sur. (B,L,D Daily),

    • Isla Baltra
    • 12/05/2020
    • 12/05/2020
    • Fly to Guayaquil, where dayrooms are reserved at the Hotel del Parque. Spend the night and return home on Day 10 at no additional cost—or continue to Quito. Ask your expedition specialist. (B); Please note: Our expeditions begin and end at Baltra, and include visits to Isla Santa Cruz and a careful selection of diverse islands. Each of our itineraries offers an optimal balance of wildlife, landscapes, and experiences. All ship itineraries are subject to Galápagos National Park regulations.,

    • Cruise Ends (Debarkation)
    • 12/05/2020
    • 12/05/2020
    • Disembark this morning in Baltra and fly to Guayaquil, where we enjoy dayrooms at the Hotel del Parque. You may elect to spend the night and return home on Day 10 at no additional cost—or continue to Quito. Ask your expedition specialist.

    • Air Travel
    • 12/05/2020
    • 12/05/2020
    • Disembark this morning in Baltra and fly to Guayaquil, where we enjoy dayrooms at the Hotel del Parque. You may elect to spend the night and return home on Day 10 at no additional cost—or continue to Quito. Ask your expedition specialist.

    • Guayaquil
    • 12/05/2020
    • 12/05/2020
    • Disembark this morning in Baltra and fly to Guayaquil, where we enjoy dayrooms at the Hotel del Parque. You may elect to spend the night and return home on Day 10 at no additional cost—or continue to Quito. Ask your expedition specialist.

National Geographic Islander

National Geographic Islander

National Geographic Islander Specifications

  • Tonnage: 5,000
  • Year Built: 1995
  • Registry: Ecuador
  • Total Rooms: 24
  • Passenger Decks: 3
  • Number of Crew: 15
  • Total Capacity: 48
  • Passenger Capacity: 48

Lindblad Expeditions

Lindblad Expeditions

Description:

Since 1979, Lindblad Expeditions has provided an alternative way to explore the world. Although each expedition is different, there are some elements that are common to all of them: they are designed to take you to places of natural beauty and compelling history, avoiding crowded tourist stops to actively experience beauty, wilderness and the seldom-seen. While the destinations may be adventurous, guests enjoy comfortable accommodations, fine food and service. An enthusiastic staff of naturalists and historians, National Geographic photographers, and Lindblad-National Geographic certified photographers are on hand to share their knowledge and inspire you. Drawn from the top tiers of journalism, science, and world affairs, the speakers in our Global Perspectives program add an extra layer of insight  to the expertise our expedition team and National Geographic photographers provide. Available exclusively aboard National Geographic Explorer, our program enables guests’ to travel with fascinating people that they might have seen in the news, on television, or in a lecture hall – now easily available to them in person, in the intimate and conversational context of an expedition. You’ll experience the sheer joy of traveling to new, exciting places with a small group of like-minded people, in an informal atmosphere. Spontaneity and flexibility are hallmarks of Lindblad’s expedition style, so you’ll always experience the wonders of the unplanned events nature provides along the way, from breaching whales, to an inspection of the ship by a curious young polar bear.

Inspired by Jacques Cousteau, Sylvia Earle, Bob Ballard  and other National Geographic explorers, Lindblad ships travel with undersea specialists who dive to video and reveal the undersea – then displayed in the warmth of the ship’s lounge in vivid HD with interesting commentary by the specialist. The footage may be of marine life few scientists, or human eyes for that matter, have ever seen.

Lindblad Expeditions + National Geographic Alliance

Since 2004 the multifaceted Lindblad Expeditions-National Geographic alliance has inspired travelers to participate in the world of natural and cultural history as engaged, active explorers who care about the planet and it has enabled them to interact with world-renowned scientists, naturalists and researchers and uncover stunning natural environments alongside skilled specialists utilizing state-of-the-art exploration tools.

Ships Description:

Lindblad’s fleet consists of nimble, intimately-scaled expedition ships, able to safely venture where larger cruise ships cannot!

Special Programs:

Explore your world for yourself! Participate in citizen science and have meaningful, personal encounters with nature.

Fees Statement:
Prices are per person and include cabin fare, taxes, fees, excursions and all meals while onboard.  Airfare is available at an additional charge unless otherwise stated.

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